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D&D 3E
Players who push your limits? 
10th-Jan-2006 01:15 pm
mjbotdf
Man, I'm so glad I found this community! I don't know what I'd do with all these questions otherwise.

Anyway, as I mentioned earlier, this is my first time DMing. We managed to get the group mostly together after last session, so that's a bit less of a concern. Now I'm frustrated with one of my players trying to take advantage of me. He was the DM from last session, and has certainly played the most D&D of all of us, which makes this even more frustrating.

The first thing he asked was if he could start as a rich guy who's bored with life, instead of your stereotypical poor adventurer. He swore up and down it wouldn't affect gameplay, it was just a good background story. Foolishly, I agreed, and now he's saying things like "I buy this, I buy that, I invite all these obscenely important people over to my house," etc. Grrr. I'm thinking about having someone rob him so he's more on eqwual footing with everyone else.

Second, remember how two characters were going to try to rob his house? I asked him to give me an idea of what his house was like, and the sorts of defenses he might have. He asked if he coudl have magical defenses, and I said some, thinking of maybe a symbol of sleep and an alarm spell or something. No, he wants to have freaking Forbiddance cast on his bedroom, a statue to summon a cleric in case of trouble, oodles of guards, etc. adding up to like 10000GP, which he justifies by estimating his networth as being maybe 500000 GP or something. WTF? And he got annoyed that I added a door to the kitchen so his poor servants could escape in case of a fire. Fortunately, none of it really made a difference since the would-be thieves were real morons and were caught by a patrolling guard, but still.

Finally, last time I had an adventure in the sewers to get rid of the city's dire rat infestation. Naturally, being pompous and rich, he didn't go. Well, everyone levelled from the myriads of slain rodents, but he's like 1500XP away from level 4. Now he's whining about being far behind and wants to be rewarded for what he did last session - which was deciphering some poetry and selling all the crap he found from the first adventure. He claims he "didn't know" that he wouldn't get XP from that and would be so far behind. Huh? This is D&D, not Monopoly. So he wants me to catch him up to the rest of the group, and now he'd do more adventuring since "now he knows." WTF? Half a level of unearned XP? That's hardly fair to those who were getting grimy and diseased from fighting rats in the sewers. If I give it to him, it'll be a level in the NPC Aristocrat class.

I don't know, maybe I am overreacting a bit. But still, how do you deal with players who try to push your limits?
Comments 
10th-Jan-2006 08:56 pm (UTC)
Yeah you shouldn't have let him have oodles of cash. Also letting him decide how much he's worth is something else.

Make the stuff not work, or the guards run away because he's a cheep bastard. Or what-have-you. Honestly How is he making all this money because the taxes alone would be expensive, as is the upkeep. Paying all those servants.

500,000 gold?!???!?! Thats the wealth of royalty. not PCs, maybe a PCs father.

That could also be true. His father owns the stuff and he's cut off.
10th-Jan-2006 10:40 pm (UTC)
The money is tied up in his investments - the idea is that he has a chain of stores in various cities, and he comes up with 10,000 a year, 8,000 of which is spent maintaining his home. But that still seems like a bunch to me.
13th-Jan-2006 07:40 am (UTC)
If he thinks his character is an 'elitist', part of the circle of the richies, wouldn't it take some money to ~stay~ in that circle? Maybe it's just me, but in order to keep some of those so-called-'friends'/connections/aquantences you had to dole out some dough, whether it be by taking them out to dinner, buying them gifts, showing off or showing up how rich you were...

I mean, if the elite (assuming they are the greedy type) thought you were a complete dufus with money/power, they would either outcast you because they didn't want to be associated with you, or they would try to rob you blind. I say make this guy work for his rich people connections. ^.~
10th-Jan-2006 09:02 pm (UTC)
Starting gold for anyone under 10th level is certainly not 10,000 GP, and obviously not five times that. I would tell him that you've thought it over, and if he wants to be "high society/rich" for background that's fine, but the wealth has to be tied up somehow, he's the prodigal son, etc. He's supposed to be "bored with aristocracy", so it's completely out of character for him to voluntarily invite all these rich people over for tea and crumpets. Flat-out refuse to hand him that much cash to guard his possessions, it's unfair to everyone else. If he's the prior DM, he should be able to comprehend this.

Also, he should have known that not going adventuring would mean he's miss out on some XP. It's role-playing, he made some bad choices, it's his fault. Unless it's making things harder on you as a DM, then don't hand him XP. At higher levels, a couple thousand XP will even out, don't worry.

You're the DM. You're not even God, you're God's Boss. Drop a ten-ton suitcase on him if he gets too mouthy, you'll thank me for it later.
10th-Jan-2006 09:04 pm (UTC)
Also, I love the "PC was robbed" and "servants ran away, castle fell to ruins" ideas. If he continues to address these concerns instead of getting with the group, tell him he just embarked on his own Royalty campaign and you'll have to take care of it in a month or two when this campaign's hassles are over. Of course, he can always roll up a new character and join the group...
10th-Jan-2006 10:42 pm (UTC)
Hmm, maybe I'll have a high level bad guy rob him when he's gone, and oops - can't go after him because he's too low level! Need to wait another 10 or so... :p
11th-Jan-2006 05:28 am (UTC)
You can't quite say :"No, you can't go after him.... just give him a repuatation and a calling card that says "Don't fuck with him"...and if he does... make it interesting. make the robber have a mage ally who drives this guy psycologically insane.

Kills his father, mother.... etc.
11th-Jan-2006 03:59 pm (UTC)
Well, I wouldn't say outright "No, you cannot go after him," but he'd metagame enough to know that any guy who could, say, teleport in and put on an antimagic field would mean instant death to a 4th level party.
10th-Jan-2006 09:12 pm (UTC)
Pushing your limits is right. He's trying to figure out how much he can weasel out of you, that much I'm certain of. And quite frankly, how long he has played D&D should not matter. I've run into people who played D&D 3rd edition for a whole year and still could not get their heads wrapped around attacks of opportunity, never mind advanced topics like game balance and wealth level.
10th-Jan-2006 10:44 pm (UTC)
Ugh, it infuriates me that everyone else, who have been D&Ding for maybe a year, gets it, but he's been doing it for like 10 years. And I know he's pushing my limits - we had a short, ill-fated campaign this summer where he pushed the limits with the DM, and ended up with all sorts of insane money and items early on. The campaign fell apart as a result.
10th-Jan-2006 09:14 pm (UTC)
"Back in Jerkwad's hometown, there's been a shift in power and, unfortunatley for him, all his high-powered friends have bought him is trouble. The new {insert title here} has decided to audit everyone known to be friends with {insert name}. Even worse for Jerkwad is the fact that his man of affairs has been cooking the books for some time and Jerkwad now owes the city back taxes as well as accounts in arrears to several local merchants. Total sum owing: 498,154gp"

And thus, no more power or money. Just prestige. *shrugs* If he's going to be difficult...... And he wouldn't know because he's trusted his man of affairs so completely..
10th-Jan-2006 09:18 pm (UTC)
First, 500,000 GP is too much. Consider that only the largest of large towns have shops that can support 100,000 GP items. Unless you guys are playing in a metropolis of that size, he'd be unable to acheive that kind of wealth. And if you PCs are in a town that large, to have that level of wealth, he'd have to be a civic leader or guild leader, which would put him at odds with his adventuring. Additionally, there aren't many towns that could support the use of 10K GP worth of defenses on a house-- unless he was doing them himself, which, at level 3, is not likely. Look up the charts in the DMG for town resources, and rule appropriately.

Never be afraid to say 'no'. I've done things to push new DMs in the past to try to get them to learn to say 'no'-- I didn't want what I asked for, but it was a way to teach a new DM that they are in control, not the players. Otherwise, the game would get horribly unbalanced quickly.

You need to rein in your player. First, be absolutely adamant about not giving him the XP he's behind. He chose to not participate in the adventure, and while he should get *some* XP for the work he did do, and for some IC actions, it's not worth 1500 XP. Maybe 3 or 400 at most. It was his choice, and he needs to accept the consequences of his actions.

As to his character, there are a few options. 1) Discuss the problems he's presenting to you from a game aspect with him. It's certainly possible to play a wealthy character and not have it muck up the adventuring. I had a character who was very savvy with business and my DM allowed me to amass quite a fortune-- this took many levels of RP, and I spent a large number of skill points on things like Knowledge (economics) and Profession (merchant), and so on. However, I went into it with the understanding that any monies she earned in this regard would go back into her businesses-- I used it for flavor, and the DM allowed me some small IC uses of her money-- rich clothing, good food, a storefront in any moderately sized city we visited, but I never used it for things like bribe money, or magic items or other gear. That money was all earned from adventuring.

How does this PC make his money? Where did it come from? He's going to need to have appropriate skills chosen in order to justify the background-- which is a sacrifice on his part. Those points he spends in Knowledge (civics) or something similar are points he can't spend in Spot, or Spellcraft, or whatever. Discuss all this with your player. If the PC is going to have the bonus of being wealthy, then he needs to have the penalties associated as well.

2) You can make him make a new PC. Either kill off his old character, or tell him that his PC is too unbalanced and he needs to come up with a new concept. Goes back to being able to say 'no'. You're the DM, and you should be the one in control. If the PC doesn't fit with the game you've setup, then it needs to be changed.

3) Discuss the issues with the party as a whole. I'm pretty sure the rest of the party isn't going to feel that his poetry translation is worth the XP he's asking for, especially in light of the work they went through clearing the sewers for the XP they earned. He's really not that far behind anyway. He can catch up eventually, if he works at it.

4) Find a way to strip him of his monies in game. Is he a civic leader? Perhaps he's caught in a scandal (doesn't even have to be real), and is stripped of lands and titles. Perhaps his hanging around with adventurers and other unsavory types leads him to fall out of favor. Is he a merchant? Maybe his investments go sour and he's left penniless. Or his business interests are taken over by another party. Maybe there's a plague or a fire in the city, and his lands are affected, leaving him with nothing. There are myriad options here as well.

It's up to you as to how you handle it. You're the DM, and the unwritten rule of D&D is that the DM is always right.
10th-Jan-2006 10:39 pm (UTC)
THe idea behind the ridiculous 500000GP sum was that it was all tied up in business. Here's a quote formm his email:

I figured the buisness itself (see sheet) would be worth about 500,000 gold- the equivalent of 50 million dollars. That's very posh, but not sky high (almost pitiful when compared to something like Sears). After everything was all told, Khadghar himself only gets 10,000 gp a year from his buisness (the equivalent of 100,000 dollars, which seems quite modest for a multi-millionare). Of that, 8,000 is spent on maintaining his house and lifestyle, leaving only 2,000 gp a year net gain. This shouldn't be enough to adversely effect gameplay.

Which sounds OK in theory - I mean, when he goes adventuring, he doesn't wear anything cooler than anybody else - but it's totally out of whack when they are back home.
10th-Jan-2006 11:12 pm (UTC)
Hmm, where have I heard that name before?

...(search)

Oh! You didn't make any rules about name stealing, did you? (even if you didn't, I hope he's not bragging that he made it up).

I'm sorry you have to deal with him, and there is no way to take away his riches without hurting his feelings/pride, though it probably should be done.

However, if he is only suppose to get 2000 years, wouldn't he only get about 166gp, 6sp, and 6cp a month? If so, you could rule that he doesn't have savings as he squandered it (as all cliche prodigal dilettantes do), and so he's making much leass than he would from adventuring.
11th-Jan-2006 03:55 am (UTC)
Oh no, he knows that I am an avid Warcraft fan and wouldn't dare claim his own creativity. When he told me the name for the character, I raised an eyebrow and said "Wow, someone thinks highly of himself." I don't really care - it's not like I'm going to publish our campaign or anything.

Do you think that making him do an audit before next game session would be helpful? Not as a character, but as a player telling the DM everything he has spent?
11th-Jan-2006 04:22 am (UTC)
An audit does sound good! Maybe if he went over this month, give him less the next month (or as many months as it takes to pay back a moneylender with interest, as the only way he could do so is through a loan...maybe take away 25% each month until he pays it back).

Constant vigilance is the name of the game. And Dungeons and Dragons, I guess.

Just had to check on the name ;)
10th-Jan-2006 09:21 pm (UTC)
But still, how do you deal with players who try to push your limits?

I don't let them. They can have their character background be whatever they want, as long as it doesn't affect the game mechanics in anyway. You tell him that he can be a bored aristocrat, but he needs to explain why he only has 100g spending money.

Fixing powergamers with in-game mechanics doesn't work. It just doesn't. You can't kill their characters, or steal their stuff, and expect it to solve a problem. They'll just complain that you're picking on them (and you are), and will continue to try and get things their way.

So here's what you do: you tell him you made a mistake, and he doesn't actually have all this money. Make up a plot reason if you need to (daddy took the keys to the castle away works well), but they point is, you don't let him have it. Just don't. No buts about it. You also tell him that he just needs to suck it up being a level behind everyone. The mechanics of the CR system means that he will catch up eventually, without any special effort on your part. You could also do what I do and give bonus XP for good "roleplaying" stuff (or just doing things interestingly) and he could catch up that way. But not knowing is a stupid reason and shouldn't stand up ("Well just because you didn't know a door was trapped doesn't mean you aren't still dead").

So just take away his money (out of game really), and tell him to get over himself, and move on with your life.
10th-Jan-2006 09:25 pm (UTC)
I agree with this. It was a mistake, and he did take advantage of it. For now, tell EVERYONE (not just him) that you have made a mistake and then create a plausible reason why. I would go something more like his house burned down, leaving him with nothing. Now he has a reason to live and to adventure, to catch up with the rest of the party.
10th-Jan-2006 10:51 pm (UTC)
"But still, how do you deal with players who try to push your limits?"

I nip it in the bud. I let players know right away what books I'm using, the exceptions to the rules, and rarely budge. For every request that I say "yes" to, I say "I'll consider it" about a dozen times, and "no" about two dozen times. Once or twice I've been asked to reconsider certain restrictions, and actually said "you'll need a different DM to do that".

Like others have said, practice saying "no". The players may be unaware that their requests are unbalancing, and it's the DM's job to keep that in check. If a request sounds reasonable, you can always get back to the person. If you don't know, tell them you'll think about it (and then check the rulebooks or forums). "I'll look into it" is always an acceptable answer for a DM to give, and the DM's word is always final.

Regarding the player in question, I would make him roll up a new character. It's harsh, but it sounds to me like he's trying to abuse his knowledge. He didn't know he'd lose XP for not adventuring and doesn't think 10K GP is excessive? The player was pulling a fast one (in my opinion) -- he couldn't have DM'd and not been aware of the rules he was breaking!
10th-Jan-2006 11:13 pm (UTC)
In addition to my above suggestions, how was he as a DM?
11th-Jan-2006 04:04 am (UTC)
He was really good. I don't have anything to compare with, of course. But he did a good job of setting limits and making up stories, etc. He dealt well with the rules lawyer in our group, and didn't give us too much money. A few too many extraneous riddles for my liking, perhaps, but overall good.

That's part of what's boggling me - how can such a good DM be such an assy player? Maybe because he still thinks he's the DM. :p
11th-Jan-2006 03:16 am (UTC)
The first thing he asked was if he could start as a rich guy who's bored with life, instead of your stereotypical poor adventurer. He swore up and down it wouldn't affect gameplay, it was just a good background story. Foolishly, I agreed, and now he's saying things like "I buy this, I buy that, I invite all these obscenely important people over to my house," etc. Grrr. I'm thinking about having someone rob him so he's more on eqwual footing with everyone else.

--Ok, I have played a character similar to this. The difference was that my character was frustrated with the rich life and wanted more entertainment and adventure in his life. In the events that he "buys" all sorts of items. I would have told him to use the 10000Gp or whatever amount you gave him to decorate his estate for example statues, fine paintings,rare exotic items. If he has no idea what to fill it with, ask for a background of his family and their fortune. That amount alone is for the house. After he builds his estate (without super-magic alarms mind you) Allow an reasonable amount of coinage to equip his character. --

Second, remember how two characters were going to try to rob his house? I asked him to give me an idea of what his house was like, and the sorts of defenses he might have. He asked if he coudl have magical defenses, and I said some, thinking of maybe a symbol of sleep and an alarm spell or something. No, he wants to have freaking Forbiddance cast on his bedroom, a statue to summon a cleric in case of trouble, oodles of guards, etc. adding up to like 10000GP, which he justifies by estimating his networth as being maybe 500000 GP or something. WTF? And he got annoyed that I added a door to the kitchen so his poor servants could escape in case of a fire. Fortunately, none of it really made a difference since the would-be thieves were real morons and were caught by a patrolling guard, but still.

-- Ok, if this player's concept is that he is bored with life, I doubt he would give a damn about his possesions. The kitchen door is a great idea, I have never heard of a kitchen without a backdoor. As for the mystic alarm spells, I would have said no to that unless his family had ties to local wizards or something like that. Even so, Forbbidence is a no no.--

Finally, last time I had an adventure in the sewers to get rid of the city's dire rat infestation. Naturally, being pompous and rich, he didn't go. Well, everyone levelled from the myriads of slain rodents, but he's like 1500XP away from level 4. Now he's whining about being far behind and wants to be rewarded for what he did last session - which was deciphering some poetry and selling all the crap he found from the first adventure. He claims he "didn't know" that he wouldn't get XP from that and would be so far behind. Huh? This is D&D, not Monopoly. So he wants me to catch him up to the rest of the group, and now he'd do more adventuring since "now he knows." WTF? Half a level of unearned XP? That's hardly fair to those who were getting grimy and diseased from fighting rats in the sewers. If I give it to him, it'll be a level in the NPC Aristocrat class.

-- Alright here is where you should have pulled his character. If he is bored with life, we wouldn't use the use his society status as a way to get out of work. If you watch any character that is sick and tried of the rich life, they want adventure and excitement. Seems to me that your player broke his promise about his concept not ruining his roleplay. I would tell him if he not with the group in battle, he doesn't get the xp. Simple as that. IF he doesnt like, he can leave.--
11th-Jan-2006 03:47 am (UTC)
I dislike admitting I made a mistake and I find it more enjoyable tp change that mistake into an interesting plot hook. Perhaps his competitor is stealing his business secrets. Maybe a thieves's guild has set up people to be employed there to mastermind a great rip off of his assets (and he has started to find tell tale signs of it).

As you said, it only takes affect when he as at home, so force them to travel. Maybe having the party deal with NPCs that were affected by his larger business putting them out of business and on the brink of starvation would make him understand that being rich or influenctial can be a burden or even a responsibility if he finds out his employees outed the man in unscrupulous ways.

Long story short, make lemonade from that lemon...though most of the time I find myself making Crap-ade.
11th-Jan-2006 04:16 am (UTC)
I think you could get away with leaving him with the stuff he has, but pointing out that the amount he has to live on has recently dropped(for whatever reason (perhaps his accountant has been embezzling, or one of the methods other people have mentioned.)) and that "spending money" would include those parties, not his "house money" (which would be taxes, staff wages etc etc etc etc) so he now owes a certain amount to some people who'll need paying(maybe including the high level wizard who made the defences he can't actually pay for). That gives him a good reason to go adventuring etc, to get hold of that cash (and out of the heat for a while).

Shopping may count as an encounter, were there rolls involved? It should be woth a couple of hundred to four maybe if there was risk involved. Certainly don't give him the same as if he'd gone on the adventure...and remember that when he's not there the XP isn't divided by as many people.

You can just say no, but I often find it more fun to say yes, then use it >;) although the XP is a straight NO! I'd think.

Is he tithing to a church? if not the cleric calling thing should be a no too, and even if he is that's just standard duty, they'd want more than 1/10 for that sort of service.
Figure out the wages etc for this supposed staff too including guards even if they're only on retainer for if called.

This is just a couple of quick thoughts for if you decide not to actually make him change PC.

Oh and bad-guys will know which is his house etc, so that could be fun.
11th-Jan-2006 04:47 am (UTC)
Easy solution -- "A Dragon eats you and takes your money." If he's going to be difficult and not do the adventures, and I hope you'll pardon my language, fuck him. Let him squander away. If he wasnt to play, he can make a normal character like everyone else.

Now for some levity -- a PC in a campaign got himself a ring of wishes with one wish left. He wished for 10000xp and a new belt. In a gout of flame and a smell of brimstone, a Huge Fire Elemental appeared before him, wearing a shiney new belt.
11th-Jan-2006 07:16 am (UTC)
As probably the DM with the most experience running games here (Gaming for about 25 years), let me give you some advice.

When someone asks for something that you think might have a bad effect on your game, ask why he needs it. Ask how it will affect his character to have, rather than not have, the item, spell, ability, or cash in question. What is the reasoning for it? If it won't come up, then why do it? What's the point of putting a sum to his unspendable cash if it is unspendable? Simply say it is a lot, and that is the end of that.

Also, never ever EVER base a character's wealth on real world finances. EVER. It doesn't work like that. Seriously, a D&D character can live on, what 5 copper a week? They don't buy prepared meals often. Taverns are more for drink and in medieval times, most tavern bills were cared for with trade. I give you a goat, you give me X drinks. Add to that, the D&D costs of items is geared towards adventurers, not common people. While we can afford to spend $20 of notebook paper, the average D&D NPC would shit himself to find his kid bought a vial of ink or even a sheet of parchment. There IS no price equivalent.

And the very idea of running stores in multiple cities doesn't work. How do you run a store when the soonest you can hear anything about it is a week from the occurance? Cities aren't laid out next to each other, they are day trips and the average aristocrat surely isn't going to waste his time with another city when he can invest in the one he lives in. The exception to this are traders and they don't opperate stores, they sell goods between cities. Again, modern thought does not apply itself well to a fantasy setting.

Then there's allowing him to get away with the excuse that he "wouldn't get as much XP for selling loot". Uh-uh, never flies. Trading goods is NOT the same as following the theme of the game. If they are adventurers, they get XP from adventure. If it is a more role-play focused game, they get it mainly from character interaction. Problem solving games get it for translating poetry, not hack 'n' slashers, and even then it best damn well be important to the campaign to be worth anything over a small amount of XP. Keep in mind the XP needed for leveling in 3.5 and 3.0. It's no longer in the millions to hit 20th. Awards are smaller. Giving 1500 for stuff that should be handled behind the scenes is outragious. A White-Wolf game you might get awards for stuff like that, but D&D? Don't let him talk you into it.

The best way to handle a problem player is to be outright with it. Tell him how he's being a problem and how you're going to handle it. Letting it slide only breeds ill feelings from the rest of the group and resentments can tear a game apart. But, if you don't come across as accusatory and instead present a problem and allow him to help fix it, people will feel better. Who knows? He's a DM. Maybe he'll see how it affects the group and he'll change. If not, better to lose one bad player than a whole group that's doing the right thing.

But it also depends how serious you want to take your game. I usually run games that are just for shits and giggles. If someone came to me and said "Dude, I want my character to be rich! Make me rich!" I'd do it. Sure, I'd tax the hell out of him, make him pay extra for everything (Rich people don't spend 2 gold on a backpack. That's a commoner's backpack!), have him robbed by thieves (Especially if he ever played a thief and constantly robbed rich targets), involve a lot of business ventures for him to fail at, have his business bring adventures in the game (Shipping? Pirates/bandits are claiming your well travelled roads. Shopkeep? Store gets robbed/someone demands protection money), and generally make his life hell. My players know this and regularly ask for their characters to be in some better than starting condition, just for the fun of seeing me try and make them pay for it.
11th-Jan-2006 01:22 pm (UTC)
I'm not adding anything entirely new to the thread, but here is my take.

1) Give him (player) a chance to make amends. *If the other players are ok with it*, allow him to catch up in XP. Maybe give him a special task. If he pulls the stunt again, tough for him. He's got to work with the team. "There is no 'I' in 'adventuring party'." Wait, there is. You know what I mean. ;)

2) Remind him that he said the money would not affect the game, that it was a background hook. Remind him that he's "bored with life"... as a rich person. Time to start acting like it and start adventuring. The character might grumble and be put off in-game with things like sewers, but he might be strangely fascinated. Or maybe he's tired of caring whether his clothes are clean and his nails manicured. I wouldn't mention the example to the player, but I think of Batman. On the streets he's another hero/adventurer. The problem with Batman is that the wealth gave him toys.

3) If #2 doesn't work, take the money. Robbing him might work, but you said the money is in investments and such. Well, blackmail him. Have someone working for him embezzle and/or extort money. Have him somehow disgraced so he has to leave his rich life behind. A good fire sale (minus the sale) is a good way to get rid of assets.

4) Remind the player that money attracts scoundrels. The longer he lives a life of a rich person, the more attention he will get from people who want that money. This could play into #3. Maybe the local mafia-type organization or thieves' guild wants "protection money". Or maybe they just want the loot. Maybe they want him dead for a business deal that got in the way of their own plans.
11th-Jan-2006 09:31 pm (UTC)
Well, s'alot of comments, and my eyes are going to bleed if I read through all of them, so I'll just throw in my input.


1- If he wanted such a high society background with shitloads of cash, you should have bumped him down a level (or two, depending on how rich) from everybody else. Oodles of cash makes up for levels, believe you me. Especially if you know what you're buying.

2- He shouldn't be able to have servants unless he's level 6 with the Leadership feat. Until then, nobody is actually required to listen to him. Make everybody servants to, say, his family but he isn't the head of the household. Sure, he holds weight and they'll bend over backwards for him sometimes, but he doesn't put the food in their stomachs, so the only real reason not to piss him off is to keep big poppa happy.

3- To become "bored with life" he would have to be rather older than the average adventurer. Young rich people revel in it, rather than get bored with all their wealth, because there's a LOT to do with all that money and it'll take a good few years to get bored with it. Slap some years on him, (and don't be stingy, give him age penalties) and see how he fares.


The background is great, sure, but for an NPC, not a PC. Kick him in the balls right good and he'll be singing a different song. In a higher octave. :)
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